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Inkjet Forum India announces joint venture collaboration with leading Mumbai based publisher Colour Publications.

Based in Mumbai, Inkjet Forum India has established a series of successful seminars, conferences and exhibitions in India on diverse subjects such as Digital Textile Printing, Industrial Inkjet Printing, Additive manufacturing and other applications. They also provide Be-spoke consulting and market research services to the various stakeholders of the inkjet industry. Inkjet Forum India announces joint venture collaboration with Colour Publications to form CNT (Catalysing New Technologies) Expositions and Services LLP.

“We are very pleased to announce this collaboration with Colour Publications Pvt. Ltd. to form CNT” adds Aditya Chandavarkar, Founder – Inkjet Forum India, “This collaboration will help us to leverage our market leading domain expertise and industry experience on a larger platform. It will also benefit us to draw into more than 6 decades of media and technical expertise at Colour Publications to reach out to the relevant mainstream industries in a comprehensive manner. This would in-turn also allow us to bring to the market more innovative conferences and technical seminars to develop and support the inkjet printing and additive manufacturing technology in India. We felt the need to infuse some new thoughts and minds into the same, and also take the inorganic growth path where needed to achieve our goals.” Under the new arrangement, Inkjet Forum India now stands acquired by CNT, and will conduct its activities under the auspices of CNT, guided by CNT’s vision and principles.

Dilip Raghavan, MD of Colour Publications Pvt. Ltd, adds “Aditya Chandavarkar brings with him about 8 years of experience in business analysis, printing expertise and his expertise of creating Inkjet Forum India, which is the only platform in India for inkjet printing technology. It also gives us an immediate footprint and a quick market access in this specific area of Inkjet Printing. It gives us 5 years of assimilated experience, industry contacts and domain knowledge. Our core identity and expertise at Colour Publications gives us the downstream industry penetration where we could help the industry and technology grow in a sustainable and healthy manner”

The new engagement begins without any further ado and is already on track. CNT will develop and organise two diverse events – Inside 3D Printing Mumbai (I3DP) 2016 and Inkjet India 2016 focussed on additive manufacturing and digital textile printing respectively.

Inkjet India 2016 – Digital Textile Conference is to be held in Mumbai on 7th December 2016, during the INDIA-ITME Event to allow delegates from across the country and also overseas to be a part of the same. This would be a one-day conference with theme displays and technology showcases from across the digital textile printing supply chain. We already have leading technology players signed up for the same.

I3DP Mumbai Expo and Conference moving into its second year after a successful launch last year will be held on 1st and 2nd December 2016 at the Nehru Centre. I3DP Mumbai will feature two days of conference sessions led by top industry experts, and two days of exhibitions presenting the latest 3D printers and services. Session topics will explore the ways to apply additive manufacturing to meet industrial and commercial needs in various industries including rapid prototyping, product development, medicine, automotive, technology, software, and more.

We remain optimistic that this combination of Inkjet Forum India and Colour Publications Pvt. Ltd. will help us move to the next level in terms of our service to the industry and genuinely do something to shore up these sectors and enhance the knowledge imparted to the industry therein. We seek the active involvement of the industry and also your feedback on areas where we could serve you better. We are firmly here to stay!

For further information, please contact:

Aditya Chandavarkar

Founder & CEO

Inkjet Forum India

aditya@inkjetforumindia.com

+91 9869441285

Dilip Raghavan

Managing Director

Colour Publications Pvt. Ltd.

raghavan.editor@gmail.com

+91 9820469582

 

 

 

                                   

Shanghai APPP Expo 2016 to feature Two New Seminars addressing Industrial Digital Printing Segments

The Shanghai APPP Expo – the largest exhibition in Asia featuring digital printing – is expanding its seminar programme to include two new one-day seminar events, focused on industrial applications of inkjet printing.

Organised by IJA – a new joint venture between Inkjet Forum India and Qudos Digital – the seminars will focus on the emerging opportunities for Digital Textile Printing, and for use of Digital Printing for Packaging, Labelling and Narrow Web Applications. Registration is free for all visitors to the Expo.

“The original purpose of Shanghai APPP Expo was to establish a leading exhibition in China for equipment and consumables for advertising, promotion, press and publicity. In fact, the event has now emerged as one of the most important tradeshows for the digital printing industry worldwide,” reports event manager Luke Xi. “We now increasingly see the use of digital printing in non-graphic and non-advertising applications, and these new segments offer great opportunities for business growth among our visitors and exhibitors. Hence we now devote extensive exhibition space to these emerging applications, as in shown by our Digital Textile Printing Show, and the Convertex Show, which run alongside APPP Expo at the same venue. We are delighted that now we also have seminars addressing the needs of these new industry segments, which increases the value of our events to visitors and exhibitors alike.”

Shanghai APPP Expo 2016 runs from Wed 9th March to Sat 12th March at the NECC Hongqiao, Shanghai. The accompanying IJA Summit – Digital Textile Printing will run on Wed 9th March, and focuses on the opportunities and market growth enabled by new high-speed and high performance digital textile systems and consumables, for applications such as soft signage, dress fabrics, garment printing and home furnishings. Presentations will be given in Chinese and English by knowledgeable speakers from China and from leading international companies and consultancies.

Fri 11th March will feature the IJA Summit – Digital Printing for Packaging & Labelling, the first seminar within China devoted to the emergence at last of high-speed single pass inkjet printing as a serious tool for the packaging and labelling industries, and also offering new business opportunities for sign and graphics printers. Both IJA events will provide simultaneous translation into Chinese and/or English, so that all Chinese visitors and most foreign visitors will be able to comprehend all presentations and discussions.

Graphic printers and sign shops are also well catered for, since on Thu 10th March Infotrends will again run its successful seminar on Wide Format Graphics, which was a popular event at the 2015 APPP Expo.

IJA is currently developing its seminar programmes and recruiting sponsors and speakers for the two events. The full programme will be announced and publicised early in 2016. “We are delighted to be partnering with Shanghai Modern International Exhibitions, and to provide APPP Expo visitors with high quality seminars to enable them to develop their businesses and make informed decisions about future investments in hardware and printing systems” says Stewart Partridge, managing director of IJA. “We believe the new seminar events, together with the broader range of printing systems and solutions on show at APPP Expo, will attract a wider audience of visitors who have needs outside of the graphics printing industry.”

For more details contact:

Aditya Chandavarkar                                                                                     Founder                                                                                                                    Inkjet Forum India                                                                                                   Mumbai, INDIA
aditya@inkjetforumindia.com                                                              +919869441285

 

Breakthrough Promises Increase in Inkjet Printed Composites for Industrial Production

Courtesy: Marcus Timson, InPrint 2015

Inkjet technology is noted for being innovative. This is hardly news. Neither are inkjet printed composites that possess self-healing properties, according to Dr Patrick Smith at the University of Sheffield. Although to me, the principle of being able to print something that can fix itself is staggering.

During a conversation with Patrick, I had to ask, what exactly does self-healing mean and what is meant by inkjet printed composites?

Inkjet printing is used to position droplets of polymer on a substrate of pre-preg. Pre-preg is a floppy sheet that is composed a woven carbon fibre mesh and an epoxy matrix. Stacks of pre-preg are baked to produce the tough carbon fibre composite that we are all familiar with.

However, although light and strong the carbon fibre composite is quite brittle and through use and by absorbing forces, it may fracture, forming small micro-cracks. If these microcracks are untreated they will grow leading to catastrophic failure of the bulk composite. The composite will simply break if it does not have self-healing properties. With the system developed at the University of Sheffield, the application of heat causes the printed polymer to flow and fill in the microcracks.

Professor Alma Hodzic

Ideally, the composite should be able to withstand forces, not forming microcracks in the first place. The system developed by Patrick and his colleague Professor Alma Hodzic results in a composite that has increased interlaminar fracture toughness (~30 – 50%) and that retains stiffness.

Up to now there has always been a trade off with producing a composite with self-healing properties, the introduction of self-healing systems, such as micro-beads that rupture and heal the fracture, into the composite material increases the weight of the composite.

”One of the key values of the inkjet printed composite is that its light weight is retained, it is lighter and beneficial for an array of applications.”

And according to Patrick and his colleagues Professor Alma Hodzic at the University of Sheffield, this composite is now feasible. It retains its self-healing characteristics but it does not require heavier micro beads to be introduced.

Imagine what this could mean to the production of cars, planes, trains? This could dramatically reduce weight whilst enhancing the strength and safety of a vehicle, reducing fuel consumption and increasing sustainable performance.

Additionally, the applications have tremendous value for the elderly as exoskeleton structures can be created, to suit a specific body shape providing elderly people with the support they need in order to remain mobile.

The European Office of Aerospace Research & Development has been behind this exciting breakthrough from the start for inkjet printing, principally for aeroplane and automobile production – but the applications are potentially widespread and game-changing.

So we look forward to seeing this develop into the future and perhaps seeing and hearing about it at the InPrint Show.

Courtesy: Marcus Timson, InPrint 2015

STRATASYS INTRODUCES ITS MOST VERSATILE 3D PRINTER FOR DIGITAL DENTISTRY

Minneapolis & Rehovot, Israel – Jan. 16, 2015 – Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS) a leading global provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, introduced the Objet Eden260VS Dental Advantage 3D Printer. The new system delivers expanded solutions for digital dentistry.
 
Engineered to meet the demanding production needs of mid-size dental labs and mid-to-large-sized orthodontic labs, the Objet Eden260VS Dental Advantage supersedes Stratasys’ popular Objet Eden260V Dental Advantage platform with new capabilities.
Offering productivity enhancements and greater cost-effectiveness for users, the new 3D printer is compatible with all Stratasys dental materials – VeroDent, VeroDentPlus and VeroGlaze – and it adds a soluble support option, previously unavailable on PolyJet dental systems. Soluble support technology allows the easy cleaning of dental parts with fine features, such as small removable die inserts in dental models. Additional benefits include automated support removal, which offers further advantages for dental labs by enabling lower labor cost per part.
For complete flexibility, users have the ability to switch between soluble and water jet modes to balance low-cost automation with the occasional need for hands-on support removal.
“Stratasys is fully committed to the digital dentistry market,” says Avi Cohen, director of global dental at Stratasys. “The Objet Eden260VS Dental Advantage brings supremely accurate 3D printing technology to any dental lab seeking to benefit from the future of digital dentistry and orthodontics.”
VeroGlaze with full biocompatibility
Stratasys’ advanced dental material, VeroGlaze, now meets the requirements of a Bio-compatible photopolymer. This material is ideal for applications requiring short-term, mucosal-membrane contact of up to 24 hours, enabling dental labs to use VeroGlaze to create veneer try-ins in precise A2 teeth color shade.
 
“The easy-to-use Objet Eden260VS Dental Advantage meets the needs of those dental and orthodontic labs seeking professional grade 3D printing capabilities with Stratasys’ signature PolyJet speed, accuracy and consistency,” says Cohen.
“As our most versatile 3D printing solution for the dental sector to date, this new 3D printer meets a broad range of application needs that demand delicate features or fine and complex details, while offering low cost of ownership.”
For more information about the Objet Eden260VS Dental Advantage, contact a reseller or visit Stratasys’ website. Images and spec sheets are available by visiting the Stratasys newsroom.

Xaar appoints new CEO

Cambridge: 5th January 2015 – Xaar plc (“Xaar” or “the Group” or “the Company”), the inkjet printing technology group headquartered in Cambridge, UK, announces the appointment of its new Chief Executive Officer. As announced in March 2014, Ian Dinwoodie will retire from the Company in 2015 after serving as CEO since 2003.

Following an extensive international search process, the Company is pleased to announce that Dr Doug Edwards will join the Board as Chief Executive Officer with immediate effect.

Doug joins the Company from Kodak (Eastman Kodak Company) where most recently he was President, Digital Printing and Enterprise and has been a member of the Executive Board since 2006. He started his career in the UK in a variety of technical roles with Ilford Limited, ICI, Zeneca and International Paper before moving to the US 14 years ago with Kodak Polychrome Graphics (a joint venture company between Sun Chemical Corporation and Kodak).  Doug holds a BSc in Chemistry and a PhD in Conducting Organic Materials from London University.

Phil Lawler, Chairman commented:

“I would like to express my thanks to Ian for his significant contribution to Xaar since joining the Company in 2001. Following a thorough international search I am delighted to welcome Doug to Xaar.  His appointment will strengthen the Board, providing the experience necessary to lead the Company through its next stage of development.”

Doug Edwards commented:

“It is a privilege to be asked to lead Xaar through this next phase of the Company’s development. Excellent progress has been made by the Company over the last decade but the future opportunities ahead of the Company in the world of digital printing are substantial, and I am pleased to return to the UK to take up this challenge.”

Ian Dinwoodie added:“I am delighted that Doug is joining Xaar – he brings the right combination of industry expertise and management skills to head the Company, and I look forward to handing over the reins to him in the coming months.”

Doug-Edwards_XaarCEO

Total direct-to-textile digital print solutions from MTEX to be showcased at Heimtextil 2015

MTEX Solutions is kicking off what promises to be a fantastic new year for the company at Heimtextil in January, by showcasing its new digital-to-textile printers and treatment machines for total textile solutions.
Eloi Ferreira, CEO of MTEX said: “Over the last couple of years we’ve developed the first and only total turnkey direct-to-to-textile print solution on the market.
“The direct-to-textile market is showing exciting levels of growth, and whether our customers are looking to invest in an entry level printer, or want to expand their offering through a production standard printer, we now have the perfect solution for everyone.”
The brand new MTEX Vision is designed to offer an alternative to the transfer print market, and the MTEX Blue will be introduced as an affordable entry level digital textile printer.
 2014-12-mtex-heimtextil-620x330
The 5032Pro, launched in 2014, is a second-generation version of the most popular MTEX 5032 3.2m wide textile printer which offers print speeds of up to 58sqm per hour.
“Last year we added the MTEX Steamer, MTEX Pad coater and MTEX W&D wash and dry machine to our range for complete, integrated digital textile printing solutions,” added Eloi.
“Thanks to our technical developments and highly competitive pricing, direct to textile digital printing is now within the reach and capability of the many print houses wanting to expand their suite of print solutions – and increase their income and profits.”
The MTEX Vision is aimed at the transfer print market and offers direct printing onto stretch fabrics with excellent and vibrant colours, and deep dense blacks.
The MTEX Blue is an entry level direct-to-textile digital printer with in-built fixation. It is aimed at the graphic display and apparel markets and companies wishing to enter the digital textile print market with a professional one-step solution.
The MTEX 5032 Pro is a second-generation version of the most popular MTEX 5032 3.2m wide textile printer. There is a new integrated platform on this PRO model as well as a new feeding and take up system, which uses compressed air. There is also a new continuous ink feeding system. This high-quality sublimation printing solution delivers brilliant and vivid colours for applications such as lightboxes, home textile decoration, decotex, flags, sun blinds, window fashion and automotive.
For more information visit Stand G25 in Hall 4 or go to http://www.mtex.eu

SGIA Expo Las Vegas focuses on the growing market of digitally printed textiles

c14_zone_digitaltextile

The recently concluded SGIA expo in Las Vegas focused on the growing market of digitally printed textiles with a specially focused zone. Brand managers and specifiers today are progressively working with more environmentally aware methods and materials (such as fabric and textiles) to meet consumer driven needs. The zone was a sales-free educational environment which provided a wealth of information on digital textile printing including technical and design requirements, recommended workflows, color management tips, finishing techniques, and recommended best practices for a variety of ink and fabric combinations. This zone provided an opportunity to see digital printing technologies in action and to learn how to meet the challenges of the ever-changing marketplace of digital textile printing.

The Digital Textile printing zone also featured a two-day seminar series covering topics including the technology trends, market opportunities for textile signage, fabrics for printing, dye sublimation & Future ofDigital Textile & Garment Printing.

Please visit https://www.sgia.org for more details

Additive Manufacturing at the Mechanical Engineering Summit

article

Berlin, October 22nd, 2014 – Will additive manufacturing (AM; generally known as 3D printing) change the world of our industrial processes? To which uses can we put this new technology already today, where does it still have potential for optimization? – Across the world, these questions affect mechanical and plant engineers, industrial users, researchers, and politicians.

At the 7th German Mechanical Engineering Summit in Berlin, experts gave insights into the technology’s current status. Additive manufacturing is an umbrella term for procedures which realize components directly from construction data files without the detour of tool and mold construction. Since the erection of three-dimensional structures happens layer by layer, this allows for production of highly complex components which could not be produced so far. In addition, small-volume batches down to batch size 1 become affordable. There is no limit to individualization of mass production. Spare parts out of data files and printer could replace storage in the future. But which part of this is a vision – and which is reality?

Industrial use next to basic research
“Additive manufacturing already possesses a maturity surpassing prototypes by far”, Rainer Lotz explained, general manager at the plant engineering company Renishaw. It could already be suitable and cost-efficient for small-volume batch production. All the more so if calculation encompasses the whole procedure including superior workpiece function – for example light weight construction or integration of functions. Renishaw develops, produces, and sells systems which produce components layer by layer out of finely powdered metals with a laser melting procedure. Demand for such systems is increasing rapidly.

Still, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Michael Schmidt, chairholder for Photon Technologies at the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, warned in Berlin against overestimating the maturity of additive manufacturing. While rapid growth of industrial use proves its enormous market potential, it also shows many companies’ disposition to adapt the young technology’s progress immediately. Nevertheless, all of it still happens in a very narrow process window. “It is absolutely necessary to further basic research, and to coordinate these efforts more than has been done so far,” Schmidt urged at the Mechanical Engineering Summit.

“We need a much deeper understanding of processes and materials,” Schmidt said. For in order to open up the whole potential of additive manufacturing, it is vital to broaden the so far limited choice of materials. In addition, it is necessary to reach a higher reproducibility of component properties via more exact process engineering. Mechanical and plant engineers, suppliers, and also researchers were called upon to devolop solutions suitable for industrial use for process interface equipment of today’s systems.

Additive manufacturing on the way to industry 4.0
Despite the conflicting priorities of specific industrial use and the necessity for in-depth basic research, Dr. Robert Neuhauser, general manager atSiemens AG for their branch Motion Control Systems, observes a definite trend towards industrial AM applications within mechanical engineering. Here, additive manufacturing combines with machining technologies and line concepts. “This has far-reaching consequences: procedures in the facilities change dramatically, and core competences shift from manufacture towards early phases of product life cycles – design, construction, optimization, and verification, also with help of cyber-physical systems,” he elaborated.

This shift creates a need for maximum digital consistency of data: from idea sketches up to logged production data for end-to-end tracking and tracing. The path points towards industry 4.0, and in Berlin, Neuhauser provided this catchphrase with specific meaning: “Additive manufacturing needs a consistent platform from design tools to machine automation, covering all relevant additive manufacturing procedures,” he explained. Siemens already supports these requirements in several ways, for example through the “Digital Enterprise Platform”, and through their Automation and Motion Control Solutions.

The Additive Manufacturing Association within VDMA
The exchange of experiences between mechanical engineers, users, and researchers did not start at the Mechanical Engineering Summit in Berlin. Already at the end of May 2014, the Additive Manufacturing Association within VDMA was constituted, initiated by the Printing and Paper Technologies Association within VDMA and the German Machine Tool Builders’ Association (VDW). “By now, we have approximately 60 members along the whole value chain of additive manufacturing,” Rainer Gebhardt explains, the Association’s project manager. This open and international association is meant to be a coordinating platform to facilitate communication between players of additive manufacturing, concerning questions on practical experience, research, development, as well as standardization. The Association’s website at http://am.vdma.org also serves this goal.

Contact
Rainer Gebhardt
Additive Manufacturing Association within VDMA
Tel: +49 (0)69 6603-1902
rainer.gebhardt@vdma.org

Source of the image : LZN Laser Zentrum Nord GmbH, Fotolia

Europe leads the way in digital textile printing technology development

Despite traditional screen printing methods still accounting for the majority of colour and design printing application worldwide, the digital textile printing sector is experiencing a rapid annual expansion.

Digital printing was pioneered through its application for the decoration of carpet squares in the 1970s, as an alternative to the screen printing methods utilised elsewhere. As technological advancements and industry preference began to change and develop into the 1990s, the first widespread use of digital printing technologies for textiles was for small batches of niche fabric products. In this respect the industry has not diverged. Digital textile printing is still mainly used for the development of high-quality textiles, yet only accounts for around 2% of total global textile printing.

Currently the industry is estimated to be worth around $43Bn; the volume of production is expected to increase to 1.4 billion m₂ by 2017. This once unprecedented growth can be put down to a wealth of factors, including the increase in output and quality of commercial machines; improvements in the ink quality; and development of much more sophisticated software to support digital textile printing technology.

There are many advantages to be gained in utilising digital print technology over traditional or non-digital screen printing methods. There are no size restrictions imposed upon the files which contain the digital print data, allowing designs of any size to be superimposed upon the chosen surface. The ink used is much more versatile and can cover any kind of surface, with its high-speed precision allowing the overall printing process to be undertaken much more efficiently. Multicolours can be used at no extra time or financial cost, and the design of the printers – which ensures it is the ink, rather than the machine, which moves to provide the coverage – means the potential for malfunction is minimised.

India’s high digital textile printing output, which currently stands at around 30-40million m₂ per annum, has seen a projection forecast of a 29% annual growth rate. Despite India’s rapidly developing market for digital textile printing, however, European output continues to account for the majority of the global digital textile printing market. Italy is the hotspot in the European region, with most of the European digital printing industry located in the country and specifically the Como region which has a long-standing reputation as a producer of premium quality apparel.Despite traditional screen printing methods still accounting for the majority of colour and design printing application worldwide, the digital textile printing sector is experiencing a rapid annual expansion.

Digital printing was pioneered through its application for the decoration of carpet squares in the 1970s, as an alternative to the screen printing methods utilised elsewhere. As technological advancements and industry preference began to change and develop into the 1990s, the first widespread use of digital printing technologies for textiles was for small batches of niche fabric products. In this respect the industry has not diverged. Digital textile printing is still mainly used for the development of high-quality textiles, yet only accounts for around 2% of total global textile printing.

Currently the industry is estimated to be worth around $43Bn; the volume of production is expected to increase to 1.4 billion m₂ by 2017. This once unprecedented growth can be put down to a wealth of factors, including the increase in output and quality of commercial machines; improvements in the ink quality; and development of much more sophisticated software to support digital textile printing technology.

There are many advantages to be gained in utilising digital print technology over traditional or non-digital screen printing methods. There are no size restrictions imposed upon the files which contain the digital print data, allowing designs of any size to be superimposed upon the chosen surface. The ink used is much more versatile and can cover any kind of surface, with its high-speed precision allowing the overall printing process to be undertaken much more efficiently. Multicolours can be used at no extra time or financial cost, and the design of the printers – which ensures it is the ink, rather than the machine, which moves to provide the coverage – means the potential for malfunction is minimised.

India’s high digital textile printing output, which currently stands at around 30-40million m₂ per annum, has seen a projection forecast of a 29% annual growth rate. Despite India’s rapidly developing market for digital textile printing, however, European output continues to account for the majority of the global digital textile printing market. Italy is the hotspot in the European region, with most of the European digital printing industry located in the country and specifically the Como region which has a long-standing reputation as a producer of premium quality apparel.

Konica Minolta, Inc., a company offering optimised print services, have today entered into a agreement with Italian inkjet textile printing sales company Verga whereby Verga has been acquired by Konica Minolta. Its headquarters in Como, Italy have newly established the title of Konica Minolta IJ Textile Europe S.r.l. This merge has been made with the intent to enhance the sales and services provided by the European digital textile printing markets.

The growth potential of the digital textile printing market within Europe and its surroundings is vast. With the areas of innovative design and customised luxury products proffering the main opportunities for growth in the digital print sector, premium textile production should continue to be developed in strong growth areas.Digital printing technologies

Konica Minolta, Inc., a company offering optimised print services, have today entered into a agreement with Italian inkjet textile printing sales company Verga whereby Verga has been acquired by Konica Minolta. Its headquarters in Como, Italy have newly established the title of Konica Minolta IJ Textile Europe S.r.l. This merge has been made with the intent to enhance the sales and services provided by the European digital textile printing markets.

The growth potential of the digital textile printing market within Europe and its surroundings is vast. With the areas of innovative design and customised luxury products proffering the main opportunities for growth in the digital print sector, premium textile production should continue to be developed in strong growth areas.

If you are interested in global digital textile printing research, read the latest market research: Digital Textile Printing Market

New soft signage dye-sub printer from Gandy Digital

Gandy Digital Softjet

Gandy Digital Softjet

Gandy Digital has announced Softjet, a new  soft signage, high resolution, digital dye  sublimation printer.

The Softjet is designed for textile printers and  large format print houses looking to increase  print quality and productivity, explore new  revenue streams and drive growth.

Providing print, curing (sublimation heaters)  and cutting capabilities in a total solution  package, the new Gandy Digital Softjet is an ideal platform for new print suppliers to enter the soft signage market, or existing suppliers to upgrade their service capability. As a roll-to-roll, direct to fabric printer available in widths from 1.8 to 3.3m print widths, the machine is ideal for indoor and outdoor soft signage, wall graphics, wall coverings, flags and tradeshow displays.

Hary Gandy, Gandy Digital CEO said the new printer was partly in reaction to continued growth in the signage sector: “With an average global growth rate of around 10%, the soft signage market represents a significant opportunity for large format customers.”
“Having manufactured successful fabric printers in previous lives, we utilized our experience and market knowledge to bring to market a ‘hassle free’, one process print solution, perfect for print houses looking to explore this market at low cost and with low risk.”

“For many of those already in the market, typically running fabric printing technology nearing their end of life, we recognized that Softjet was the right product at the right time from which to streamline their operation and grow their business – especially with customers demanding higher resolution and faster turnaround.”

The new product comes at an ideal time, as FESPA’s flagship European shows steadily increase space dedicated to digitally printed soft signage and textiles.

Environmental benefits
Thanks to water-based inks and low energy consumption, it also meets the prerequisites of being environmentally friendly too. This is increasingly vital to fulfilling the needs of print businesses, while also adhering to the environmental requirements – moral and regulatory – of their own customers.

Available in four and six colour models, and utilizing dye sublimation technology to provide color vibrancy better than that of other technologies, the Softjet delivers consistent sublimation control across the entire print width. This eradicates temperature fluctuations and typical problems of colour variation. Running at resolutions up to 1200 dpi, the sharp graphics on textile can also provide improved noise-reduction benefits.

From a logistics perspective, graphics printed on to fabric can also be folded with no need for heavy rolls. Compared to traditional board or PVC vinyl signage applications, this benefit leads to considerably lower distribution and storage costs.

Courtesy: http://www.fespa.com